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Dublin: 17 °C Friday 10 April, 2020
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World's most dangerous beach shut after shark attack

A South African surfer was mauled by a shark on the infamous Second Beach on Sunday afternoon.

Image: tmechin via Flickr

A BEACH IN South Africa has been closed after a shark attacked and killed a man on Sunday afternoon.

The notorious Second Beach in Port St Johns on the southeast coast has been the scene of six deaths in just five years – a statistic which makes it the most dangerous beach in the world for shark attacks.

Sunday’s victim, a 25-year-old man named locally as Lungisani Msungubana, was bodysurfing in waist-deep water when the incident occurred, reports News.com Australia.

The local station commander for the National Sea Rescue Institute said the victim sustained “multiple traumatic lacerations to his torso, arms and legs” from the shark bites.

South African website the Daily Dispatch quotes witnesses that saw Msungubana trying to fight off the shark with his surfboard for about five minutes before he was pulled out of the water.

According to the Daily Telegraph, the Natal Sharks Board is to carry out an investigation and the beach will remain closed until it is completed. That could be as late as August, a spokesman for the Port St Johns area.

Video: British man loses legs in South Africa shark attack

Top 8… countries for shark attacks

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