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Dublin: 17 °C Sunday 31 May, 2020
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Your evening longread: A tale of friendship and street art in Dublin

It’s a coronavirus-free zone as we bring you an interesting longread each evening to take your mind off the news.

Image: Shutterstock/Paul Juser

EVERY WEEK, WE bring you a round-up of the best longreads of the past seven days in Sitdown Sunday.

For the next few weeks, we’ll be bringing you an evening longread to enjoy. With the news cycle dominated by the coronavirus situation, we know it can be hard to take your mind off what’s happening.

So we want to bring you an interesting read every weekday evening to help transport you somewhere else.

We’ll be keeping an eye on new longreads and digging back into the archives for some classics.

Keep sketch

Normally, we focus on non-fiction and essays for our longreads, but sometimes we venture into different territories. So today we’re highlighting Anne Hayden’s short story Keep Sketch, published on Fallow Media. That’s partly because Anne took some inspiration from TheJournal.ie in writing this piece – and even went to the trouble of creating her own article for the site…

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(Fallow Media, approx 21 mins reading time)

We used to share a studio, me and Jimmy and Linda, before the building got bought up by a vulture fund. Jimmy was a great man for rolling cigarettes and making tea and giving unsolicited feedback on whatever we were working on but I rarely saw him do any work himself. He mostly seemed to hang around there trying to get Linda’s attention. He was full of notions about art too though, could waffle on about it for hours. Once, he suggested that we collaborate on a piece but I told him our styles were too different when what I meant was I have a style and you don’t. He was a bit sulky for a while, said something about that kind of attitude going against the ethos of street art.

Read all of the Evening Longreads here>

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