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In pictures: the first day of the Queen's historic visit

The first hours of the first ever visit by a British Monarch to the Republic of Ireland – as seen through the camera lens.

WELL, IT’S FINALLY underway – after years of wondering whether it would ever happen, and months of anxious waiting after the visit was confirmed, Her Majesty the Queen and her husband, the Duke of Edinburgh, are spending their first night in Ireland.

The couple are overnighting in Farmleigh this evening having spent the day visiting the Garden of Remembrance in Parnell Square and then Trinity College – amid heavy security presence following a series of bomb scares and a clutch of protests.

Here is our selection of snaps from the day.

In pictures: the first day of the Queen's historic visit
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  • The Queen's Visit, Day 1 (1)

    The Royal Standard flies from the front of the Queen's Range Rover as she travels from Casement Aerodrome to Áras an Úachtaráin as she arrives in Ireland at lunchtime today. (Pic: Stephen Kilkenny)
  • The Queen's Visit, Day 1 (2)

    Rachel Fox, aged 8, presents the Queen with a bouquet of flowers to welcome her to the Emerald Isle. Her Majesty's choice of Emerald Green and St Patrick's Blue does not go unnoticed. (Pic: Maxwells)
  • The Queen's Visit, Day 1 (3)

    Having met President McAleese at the Áras, Queen Elizabeth signs the official guestbook... (Pic: Maxwells)
  • The Queen's Visit, Day 1 (4)

    ...and this is the result: for the first time, a British Monarch is welcomed as a visitor to the President's official residence. (Pic: Maxwells)
  • The Queen's Visit, Day 1 (5)

    Having gotten the formalities out of the way, Her Majesty fulfils a tradition begun by her ancestors: planting a tree in the grounds of the Áras. (Pic: Maxwells)
  • The Queen's Visit, Day 1 (6)

    After enjoying a lunch (we're told she had boxty), the President and the Queen travel to the Garden of Remembrance in Parnell Square. (Pic: Maxwells)
  • The Queen's Visit, Day 1 (7)

    There, for the first time, a British Monarch lays a wreath in memory of those who died for the cause of Irish independence. The national anthems of both countries are played, before both heads of state observe a minute's silence. (Pic: Maxwells)
  • The Queen's Visit, Day 1 (8)

    As that ceremony continues, so do a handful of protests at various locations in the north inner city. (Photo: Mark Stedman/Photocall Ireland)
  • The Queen's Visit, Day 1 (9)

    21 people were arrested, with 20 of them attending sittings of Cloverhill District Court this evening. (Photo: Niall Carson/PA Wire)
  • The Queen's Visit, Day 1 (10)

    Photo: Stephen Kilkenny
  • The Queen's Visit, Day 1 (11)

    After finishing her ceremony at the Garden of Remembrance, the Queen and Prince Philip travel to Trinity College where they are met by the Chancellor of the University of Dublin, and former president, Mary Robinson. (Photo: Maxwells)
  • The Queen's Visit, Day 1 (12)

    The Queen is shown a facsimile copy of the Book of Kells by Trinity College librarian Robin Adams, before being led to the chamber housing the original copy. (Photo: Maxwells)
  • The Queen's Visit, Day 1 (13)

    The Queen is fascinated to hear the story of the traditional Irish Harp, from harpist Siobhan Armstrong who playing during her tour. (Photo: Mark Stedman/Photocall Ireland)
  • The Queen's Visit, Day 1 (14)

    The Queen smiles as she is introduced to senior figures from the world of academia, as Trinity College provost John Hegarty looks on. (Photo: Maxwells)
  • The Queen's Visit, Day 1 (15)

    Finally, getting the opportunity to meet with the public for the first time, the Queen smiles as she shakes hands with a selection of students and staff from Trinity College before retiring for the day. (Photo: Maxwells)

In pictures: The second day of the Queen’s historic visit >

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Gavan Reilly

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