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Your evening longread: Carl Bernstein on what he's learned about Trump's phone calls

It’s a coronavirus-free zone as we bring you an interesting longread each evening to take your mind off the news.

Image: Pool/ABACA

EVERY WEEK, WE bring you a round-up of the best longreads of the past seven days in Sitdown Sunday.

For the next few weeks, we’ll be bringing you an evening longread to enjoy which will help you to escape the news cycle.

We’ll be keeping an eye on new longreads and digging back into the archives for some classics.

Bernstein and Trump

Carl Bernstein has written a fascinating piece about Donald Trump, based on information he received about Trump’s highly classified phone calls with foreign heads of state. 

(CNN, approx 18 mins reading time)

The calls caused former top Trump deputies — including national security advisers H.R. McMaster and John Bolton, Defense Secretary James Mattis, Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, and White House chief of staff John Kelly, as well as intelligence officials — to conclude that the President was often “delusional,” as two sources put it, in his dealings with foreign leaders. The sources said there was little evidence that the President became more skillful or competent in his telephone conversations with most heads of state over time. Rather, he continued to believe that he could either charm, jawbone or bully almost any foreign leader into capitulating to his will, and often pursued goals more attuned

Read all of the Evening Longreads here>

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