#Open journalism No news is bad news

Your contributions will help us continue to deliver the stories that are important to you

Support The Journal
Dublin: 12°C Friday 23 April 2021
Advertisement

€100,000 allocated to free period products in Dublin City Council budget

The initiative was trialed in Dublin city last year.

Money has been granted for free pads and tampons in council buildings.
Money has been granted for free pads and tampons in council buildings.
Image: Shutterstock

THE DUBLIN CITY Council (DCC) 2020 budget has approved €100,000 for free sanitary products in buildings across the city. 

The initiative was trialed in a pilot after its approval by the council last year. It has now been granted €100,000 in funding to offer more period products to people in Dublin city. 

The Dublin City Council budget for 2020 was approved by councillors on Monday after a row over reduced finances. 

The sanitary product initiative was proposed by Labour councillor Rebecca Moynihan who said it could be used “as a template for other councils” in Ireland to do the same. 

“With over 50% of young women and girls struggling to afford products; homeless women not being able to afford or indeed access sanitary products regularly and women in direct provision having to fight to get adequate products, it is so important that this initiative has received cross-party from councillors on Dublin City Council,” Moynihan said in a statement. 

Tweet by @Rebecca Moynihan Source: Rebecca Moynihan/Twitter

Last September, it was announced that DCC would provide free sanitary products in all council buildings including swimming pools, community centres and libraries. 

The government set up a committee last month to deal with period poverty, an issue where girls and women struggle to afford sanitary products. 

Half of females aged between 12 and 19 in Ireland surveyed last year said they have experienced issues affording period products, according to Plan International.  

Moynihan said the government should introduce free sanitary products in schools and examine the Value-Added Tax (VAT) on period products that aren’t tampons and pads, which are already not subject to the tax. 

#Open journalism No news is bad news Support The Journal

Your contributions will help us continue to deliver the stories that are important to you

Support us now

“Periods are not a luxury for women and girls. It is a part of everyday life and we need to make life easier for those who may be vulnerable positions,” the councillor said.  

Read next:

COMMENTS (24)

This is YOUR comments community. Stay civil, stay constructive, stay on topic. Please familiarise yourself with our comments policy here before taking part.
write a comment

    Leave a commentcancel