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Dublin: 11 °C Friday 10 July, 2020
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Your evening longread: Jailed at 18 during a protest - and wondering when he'll get out of prison

It’s a coronavirus-free zone as we bring you an interesting longread each evening to take your mind off the news.

File photo
File photo
Image: Shutterstock/Skyward Kick Productions

EVERY WEEK, WE bring you a round-up of the best longreads of the past seven days in Sitdown Sunday.

Now, every evening, we bring you an evening longread to enjoy which will help you to escape the news cycle.

We’ll be keeping an eye on new longreads and digging back into the archives for some classics.

Joshua Williams’ story

Joshua Williams was 18 when he took part in a protest against the death of a young man, Antonio Martin. During the protest, Williams set a trash can on fire at a shop. He was jailed, and remains in jail. Here’s his story.

(GQ, approx 10 mins reading time)

Joshua Williams was 18 when he was arrested for stealing a bag of chips and lighting a QuikTrip trash can on fire in the aftermath of a protest sparked by the death of Antonio Martin near Ferguson, MO. It was December, 2014; Williams had already been in the streets for months already at that point, protesting the killing of Michael Brown by a Ferguson police officer. During that time, Williams became a well-known and well-liked activist in Ferguson. Williams eventually pleaded guilty to counts that included first-degree arson and second-degree burglary. Despite having no prior criminal record, he was given eight years, a sentence many have questioned, and his cause has since been taken up by many other community leaders in the area. He has now served five years. Later this month, he is up for parole.

Read all of the Evening Longreads here>

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