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Your evening longread: Inside the Nespresso coffee empire

It’s a coronavirus-free zone as we bring you an interesting longread each evening to take your mind off the news.

Image: Shutterstock/makesushi1

EVERY WEEK, WE bring you a round-up of the best longreads of the past seven days in Sitdown Sunday.

For the next few weeks, we’ll be bringing you an evening longread to enjoy which will help you to escape the news cycle. 

We’ll be keeping an eye on new longreads and digging back into the archives for some classics.

How Nespresso’s coffee revolution got ground down

From George Clooney to the tiny aluminium pods that started it all, Nespresso is a recognisable name in the coffee industry. Founded in 1986, the company changed the way coffee was consumed, through its innovative pod technology. With a radically different coffee industry now compared to 1986, The Guardian details Nespresso’s history and what lays in store for the company in the future. 

(The Guardian, approx 30 mins reading time)

Today, some 14bn Nespresso capsules are sold every year, both online and from 810 brightly lit boutiques in 84 countries. More than 400 Nespressos are drunk every second. Hundreds of rivals and imitators have emerged, some making capsules for Nespresso machines, others pushing competitor systems. The firm employs more than 13,000 people and the Nespresso magazine, which the company has referred to as a “bi-annual pleasure guide”, has a circulation of more than 2m. In 2013, the most recent year it released figures, Nespresso’s revenues totalled $10.8bn. Its success has provided its public face, the actor George Clooney, with the means to maintain a private satellite over Sudan.

Read all the Evening Longreads here>

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