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Radioactive water leaks from Japanese nuclear plant

Highly radioactive water has seeped into the sea beside Japan’s Fukushima nuclear plant – however experts say that the Pacific ocean will dilute the amounts to safe levels.

A man is screened for radiation contamination at an evacuation shelter in Koriyama, Fukushima prefecture, Japan, Saturday, April 2, 2011.
A man is screened for radiation contamination at an evacuation shelter in Koriyama, Fukushima prefecture, Japan, Saturday, April 2, 2011.
Image: Wally Santana/AP/Press Association Images

JAPAN’S TSUNAMI-STRICKEN nuclear power plant was leaking highly radioactive water into the sea Saturday, nuclear safety officials said.

The plant has been spewing radioactivity since March 11, when a magnitude-9.0 earthquake and ensuing tsunami knocked out power, disabling cooling systems and allowing radiation to seep out of the overheating reactors.

The water was seeping Saturday from a newly discovered crack in a maintenance pit on the edge of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear site into the Pacific Ocean, Japan Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency spokesman Hidehiko Nishiyama said.

Measurements show the air right above it contained 1,000 millisieverts of radioactivity. Exposure to 500 millisieverts over a short period of time can increase the long-term risk of cancer. But experts say radiation is quickly diluted by the vast Pacific and that even large amounts have little effect.

It wasn’t immediately clear whether workers who have been rushing to bring the reactors under control were exposed. People living within 12 miles (20 kilometers) of the Fukushima plant have been evacuated.

Nishiyama said officials will check the level of radiation in seawater near the reactor as well as seawater around 9 miles (15 kilometers) from the reactor. They will use concrete to seal the 8-inch (20-centimeter) crack and try to stop the radiation from leaking.

“This could be one of the sources of seawater contamination,” Nishiyama said. “There could be other similar cracks in the area, and we must find them as quickly as possible.”

Over the past week, radioactivity beyond the legal limit has been detected in seawater just off the plant.

- AP

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