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Dublin: 17 °C Monday 24 June, 2019
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More flood warnings as Atlantic storm makes its way to Irish shores

Another storm swell is on its way bringing wet and windy weather.

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An aerial view of the Midlands taken by the Irish Air Corps shows the extent of the flooding at Ballinasloe and Athlone. (Irish Air Corp Facebook page)

LOOKING OUT THE window this morning, you may be fooled – but another Atlantic storm depression is making its way to Irish shores and is set to land some time this afternoon.

The latest Atlantic storm depression heading for Ireland is expected to bring wet and windy weather, with flood warnings being issued for eastern and southern parts of the country.

image(View of large swell via MagicSeaweed.com)

Met Eireann has issued a status orange warning stating that:

Large waves, high tides and low pressure values are likely to lead to some coastal flooding.

Heavy rain or showers are also expected and with the water table so high, some river flooding is likely too.

The orange warning comes into effect this afternoon at 3pm and is set to last up until Wednesday morning at 9am.

Cork

Cork City Council has issued a tidal flood alert stating that there is a “particular risk predicted” for the evening tide period today.

High tide today will be at 8.37am and 8.53pm, and 9.21am and 9.36pm on Wednesday.

Speaking on RTE’s Morning Ireland Tim Lucey, Cork City Manager said that they are expecting “serious flooding” in Cork city centre.

He said that due to the tidal surge and strong southerly/south-easterly winds predicted for today, and the high water levels, could result in flooding that is even more “extensive” than has already been experienced.

The tidal flood alert is in place between 8pm and 10pm tonight covering low lying areas of the City Centre including the South Terrace, Union Quay, French’s Quay, Lapps’ Quay and the Coal quay.

South Mall, Oliver Plunkett Street and St Patrick Street, the Centre Park Road, Monahan’s Road and the Lower Glanmire Road are also on alert this morning.

For a full list of at-risk areas, see the Cork City Council website.

Inland flooding

There were also warnings yesterday that the waters  could move inland as the water levels rise.

Met Eireann has also issued a status orange wind warning for Dublin, Louth, Wexford, Wicklow, Meath, Cork, Kerry and Waterford, and a yellow wind warning for Connacht, Cavan, Monaghan, Donegal, Carlow, Kildare, Kilkenny, Laois, Longford, Offaly, Westmeath, Clare, Limerick and Tipperary.

Southeast to east winds of mean speeds 65 to 80 km/h and will gust 90 to 115 km/h at times, along southern and eastern coasts.

Areas such as Limerick and Cork have already been hammered by severe weather and floods in recent days.

Minister Brian Hayes, who has responsibility for the Office of Public Works, travelled to Limerick yesterday to assess some of the worst affected areas, stating that it was a “very grim situation”.

Relief

The Minister said that the figure of €10 million set aside for immediate humanitarian relief would not be enough to address the problem, and that he hoped Limerick City and County Council could meet the deadline of today for requesting additional funds for repairing flood damage.

He stressed that his Department will be spending in excess of €44 million on new flood relief measures over the coming year.

While we may think we are out of the worst of it after this storm, Met Eireann has said that there is another large swell expected in from the Atlantic this Friday. So, it’s not over just yet.

Read: “A very grim situation”: Further flooding expected this morning at high tide>

Read: Pics: Limerick residents return home to assess flood devastation>

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