#Open journalism No news is bad news

Your contributions will help us continue to deliver the stories that are important to you

Support The Journal
Dublin: 11°C Saturday 26 September 2020
Advertisement

Texas is fighting back against US marriage equality

The state’s attorney general said Texans ‘must speak with one voice against this lawlessness’.

Hundreds celebrated outside the US Supreme Court in Washington on Friday after it ruled that same-sex couples could marry nationwide.
Hundreds celebrated outside the US Supreme Court in Washington on Friday after it ruled that same-sex couples could marry nationwide.
Image: Jacquelyn Martin/AP/Press Association Images

TEXAS PUBLIC OFFICIALS who object to gay marriage will not have to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples, the state’s attorney general has said.

The US Supreme Court ruled on Friday that same-sex marriage is a legal right in all 50 states.

But in a statement yesterday, General Ken Paxton said that county clerks can decline to issue licenses on the grounds of religious freedom.

He said “numerous lawyers” are prepared to provide free legal defence to any clerk who faces litigation for refusing to grant one.

“Texas must speak with one voice against this lawlessness, and act on multiple levels to further protect religious liberties for all Texans,” he wrote.

First amendment

Paxton stated that the Supreme Court ruling does “not diminish, overrule or call into question” the first amendment of the American constitution, which protects religious freedom.

#Open journalism No news is bad news Support The Journal

Your contributions will help us continue to deliver the stories that are important to you

Support us now

“County clerks and their employees retain religious freedoms that may allow accommodation of their religious objections to issuing same-sex marriage licenses,” he said.

“Justices of the peace and judges similarly retain religious freedoms and may claim that the government cannot force them to conduct same-sex wedding ceremonies over their religious objections.”

Last week’s Supreme Court judgement overruled the bans on same-sex marriage in 14 states, including Texas.

In a statement shortly after the ruling, the Texas governor, Greg Abbott, said that the court had “abandoned its role as an impartial judicial arbiter” and “imposed on the entire country their personal views on an issue that the constitution and the court’s previous decisions reserve to the people of the states”.

Read: Same-sex couples in America now have the right to marry in all 50 states >

Read: ‘We are really f***ing happy about being homosexual’ >

About the author:

Catherine Healy

Read next:

COMMENTS (257)