#Open journalism No news is bad news

Your contributions will help us continue to deliver the stories that are important to you

Support The Journal
Dublin: 3°C Sunday 29 November 2020
Advertisement

Poor people in Ireland are twice as likely to die of cancer

The Irish Cancer Society said there are “worryingly high” rates in some of the poorest parts of Dublin.

Image: cancer patient image via Shutterstock.com

THE IRISH CANCER Society has highlighted new research that shows you are twice as likely to die from cancer if you live in a poor area.

Death rates in some areas, notably some of the poorest parts of the Dublin region, are more than twice as high as more affluent areas.

Today, the cancer charity said the death rates are “worryingly high” and this must be tackled as a priority.

An interactive map has been compiled by Dr Jan Rigby, and colleagues from the Centre for Health Geoinformatics at NUI Maynooth, funded by the Health Research Board. It shows considerable health gaps, particularly between areas in Dublin.

Cancer death rates in Dublin during 2009 to 2011 varied from:

  • 381 per 100,000 in Blakestown North-West
  • 310 per 100,000 in Blanchardstown North
  • 265 per 100,000 in Ballymum East
  • 141 per 100,000 in Foxrock/Cabinteely SW
  • 138 per 100,000 in Malahide East
  • 128 per 100,000 in Castleknock South-East

“Unfortunately, the more deprived the area, the higher the risk of a person getting and dying from cancer,” commented the Irish Cancer Society’s Head of Advocacy Kathleen O’Meara. “As well as this, often the poorest in society have the greatest difficulties in accessing healthcare.”

In some deprived Dublin areas, there are not enough primary care resources – for instance in North Dublin there is one GP for every 2,500 people. Nationally this figure is 1:1600. In addition there have been increased A&E charges, long stay charges and increased prescription charges. By 2013 it has meant that every person in Ireland was on average paying about €100 in additional costs for accessing care and prescribed drugs.

#Open journalism No news is bad news Support The Journal

Your contributions will help us continue to deliver the stories that are important to you

Support us now

The Irish Cancer Society is beginning a campaign to ensure the link between health inequalities and cancer is recognised in the new ten-year National Cancer Strategy, which will be published in 2016, as well as actions recommended to address it.

Read: This Dublin-designed probe is much smaller than a hair… and it could help cure cancer>

Read: Hospital grants dying woman’s final wish to say goodbye to beloved horse>

Read next:

COMMENTS (33)